Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Around B3, photos show pedestrians pushed into street with no safeguards, questionable sidewalk closure, easier path for trucks

Imagine if the Democratic National Convention were being held at the Barclays Center? On top of creating a frozen zone that would impact blocks of retail businesses and residences, they surely would have had to shut down Pacific Park construction.

After all, as these Instagram posts showing conditions on 7/18/16 around the 38 Sixth Avenue (B3) site remind us, it's dicey just for locals. That building is flush to the Barclays Center.

Sidewalks on both sides of Dean Street between Flatbush and Sixth avenues were closed, with unhelpful signage--seemingly ad hoc--and no intervention by pedestrian managers, forcing pedestrians into the street, with no protected area.

The sidewalk was closed, workers said, because pedestrians were still in danger from debris falling from the building under construction, but those workers nonetheless took breaks, without helmets, in that area. (Were they just creating a private zone?)

Consider: if there'd been a convention, and construction shut down, the sidewalk still might have had to close.

The final photo shows that the exit from the B3 site should allow trucks to exit down Sixth Avenue to Flatbush Avenue rather than use residential Dean Street, which was approved last year as an alternative. (Trucks are supposed to go the shortest distance to a truck route.) Why no further evaluation?

Concrete truck barreling down Dean Street between Carlton and Vanderbilt from B3 on Monday, July 18th at 9:26 AM. Lower photo is the truck exit at B3 at 9:30 AM the same day. That photo is from 6th Avenue looking north into the construction site. We've been told there is a turn somewhere that it is difficult for trucks to make, and that is why DOT allows B3 contractors to step outside DOT truck route regulations. This has been going on for at least a year without a clear explanation why it is necessary. We've heard it is because a turn is too sharp for the trucks to make. Originally we were told it was this one out of the construction site, but the photo shows these concrete trucks could drive south on 6th (and conform to DOT regulations) without a problem. In fact I haven't seen a single circumstance in a year in which 6th Avenue couldn't have been used. Can someone once and for all say what the specific problem is? Why can't the State, the developer or NYC DOT answer a straightforward question in a straightforward way? I guess kicking the ball down the road almost always pays off. #bciza #pacificparkbk @pacificparkbk @nycmayorsoffice @nyc_dot @nypd78thpcc @hdr_inc @STVGroup @atlanticyards_pacificpk_report @matrixneworld @nyc311
A photo posted by @pplegacy on

No comments:

Post a Comment